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CAPITAL CORP. SYDNEY

73 Ocean Street, New South Wales 2000, SYDNEY

Contact Person: Callum S Ansell
E: callum.aus@capital.com
P: (02) 8252 5319

WILD KEY CAPITAL

22 Guild Street, NW8 2UP,
LONDON

Contact Person: Matilda O Dunn
E: matilda.uk@capital.com
P: 070 8652 7276

LECHMERE CAPITAL

Genslerstraße 9, Berlin Schöneberg 10829, BERLIN

Contact Person: Thorsten S Kohl
E: thorsten.bl@capital.com
P: 030 62 91 92

Hard Money

Nationwide Hard Money Lending from Houston

What is Hard Money?

A hard money lender is an investor who makes loans secured by real estate, typically charging higher rates than banks but also making loans that banks would not make, funding more quickly than banks and/or requiring less documentation than banks.

Process to Obtain a Loan

Submit the application

Find the best program for you

Get pre-qualified for your loan

Lock in the interest rate

Close the loan!

Houston Hard Money Lender

Fix and Flip Program

  •  No Upfront Fees
  • Up to 12 Months
  • Rates as low as 7.99%
  • Up to 75% of ARV
  • Up to 90% LTC
  • Up to 100% Rehab
  • Origination As Low As 3 Point
  • Closing Time: 5-14 days after all documents received
  • Minimum Loan Amount: $100,000
  • Maximum Loan Amount: $2,500,000
Documents Required
  • Form 1003
  • Scope of Work
  • Draw Schedule
  • Last 3 months of bank statements from business and personal
  • Entity Documents
  • Copy of the Tri-merge report (full pages)
 Non-Owner Occupied:
  • Single Family Residences (SFR)
  • 2-4 unit properties
  • Condos
  • Townhomes

Single Rental Program

  • No Upfront Fees
  • Up to 75% Purchase Price
  • Origination As Low As 3 Points
  • Closing Time: 2 – 3 weeks after all documents received
  • Minimum Loan Amount: $100,000
  • Maximum Loan Amount: $2,500,000

 

Documents Required
  • Form 1003
  • Scope of Work
  • Draw Schedule
  • Last 3 months of bank statements from business and personal
  • Entity Documents
 Non-Owner Occupied:
  • Single Family Residences (SFR)
  • 2-4 unit properties
  • Condos
  • Townhomes

Territories:

  • All states except NY and NJ

States We Serve

  • Alabama
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Kentucky
  • Maryland
  • New Jersey
  • North Carolina
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Pennsylvania
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Virginia
  • Wisconsin

What is a hard money lender?

A hard money lender is an investor who makes loans secured by real estate, typically charging higher rates than banks but also making loans that banks would not make, funding more quickly than banks and/or requiring less documentation than banks.

What differentiates hard money lenders from bank lenders?

  • Hard money lenders differ from bank lenders in that they often fund more quickly, with fewer requirements. Hard money lenders are sometimes called “asset-based lenders” because they focus mostly on the collateral for the loan, whereas banks require both strong collateral and usually excellent credit and cash flow from the borrower.
  • Hard money lenders are willing to foreclose on and “take back” the underlying property if necessary, to satisfy the loan. Bank lenders typically look at the borrower to be able to pay back the underlying loan from the borrower’s income, whereas hard money lenders are comfortable looking to a sale or refinance of the property as the method of repayment.

Why do hard money lenders exist?

Hard money lenders exist because many real estate investors need a quick response and quick funding to secure a deal when looking for a real estate loan. Banks and other institutional lenders that offer the lowest interest rates don’t provide the same combination of speed and transparency in their decision making process, along with quick access to capital.

When does it make sense for a developer to use a hard money loan?

In our experience, even investors/developers with strong financial statements and access to bank credit frequently choose to use private money loans (also called “hard money loans”). Situations where private money loans make the most sense include those where the borrower:

  • Requires a quick closing and banks cannot meet the deadline;
  • Has more good opportunities than cash;
  • Wants to avoid spending too much time raising equity or debt from many different smaller investors, but prefers to instead focus on finding new opportunities;
  • Lacks the patience or time to deal with¬†the bureaucracy¬†of securing a loan from a bank;
  • Has an excellent investment opportunity, but does not have sufficient financial strength to get a bank loan, and/or;
  • Has a bank line of credit but needs a larger loan than is allowed under the existing bank line.

The common theme is that there is an opportunity for the borrower to generate substantial profit (or savings) quickly, and the cost of interest and origination fees is small relative to the anticipated profit, even given the higher interest rates charged by private lenders versus banks.

What are other terms for hard money loans?

Hard money loans are also sometimes referred to by the following terms:

  1. Private money loans
  2. Bridge loans
  3. Short-term loans
  4. Transitional loans
  5. Asset-based loans

What are advantages of hard money lenders?

Hard money loans can have a number of advantages over traditional bank financing including:

  • A simpler application process and quicker approval/disapproval decision;
  • Less scrutiny of the borrower’s personal financial situation, including income and historical tax returns, compared to bank loans;
  • Borrowers can allocate less time to seeking financing and instead concentrate on other business;
  • Borrowers can avoid the humiliation of being rejected by a bank;
  • Most hard money lenders do not expect perfect credit and substantial amounts of disposable income from borrowers, but instead focus on the merits of the specific deal under consideration;
  • Self-employment is not seen as unacceptable to private lenders, whereas many banks view self-employment negatively and strongly prefer lending to professionals with very steady income.

What are some disadvantages of hard money lenders?

  • Hard money loans are more expensive than bank loans, with higher interest rates and origination fees;
  • The quality of hard money lenders varies substantially from one lender to another; some are unscrupulous and may be seeking to have the borrower default in order to foreclose on underlying real estate as a business strategy;
  • Some lenders may collect non-refundable deposits without having the capital required to make the loan; they may either hope to find the capital once the loan is “tied up” or in rare cases, they may simply aim to collect the deposit with no intention of funding the loan.

What kinds of property do hard money lenders lend on?

  • Vacation Home
  • Commercial Property
  • Non-Owner Occupy Property
  • Multi-Family Unit (1-4)
  • Development of Property

When should you use a hard money lender?

A borrower might consider using a hard money / private money loan in situations where he or she is willing to pay a higher interest rate and/or higher origination fees in the interest of gaining access to capital more quickly, dealing with less bureaucracy and more transparency during the application process, and finding capital to pursue an opportunity that banks will not finance, either because they are unwilling or unable to do so

What does the term "hard" mean in "hard money lender"?

The “hard” in hard money lending refers to the higher price which is charged to borrowers both in terms of interest rates (typically high single digits or low double digits) and higher loan origination fees (often around 2 percent of the loan amount, versus 1 percent or less for a typical bank loan).

Who funds hard money loans?

Hard money loans are typically funded by individuals or by funds that aggregate capital from multiple wealthy investors. Individuals who invest directly into a single loan are known as trust deed investors. Many trust deed investors are real estate investors/owners who invest in “bridge loans” to keep available capital working to generate a higher rate of return, rather than leaving the capital in banks earning minimal interest rates. Investors who prefer to invest passively in a fund are typically not as experienced in real estate investment and choose to pay the fund manager a fee to oversee the process of sourcing, selecting and originating a series of bridge loans.